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Help us help you — Just think 111 first

When you think you need A&E, contact NHS 111 by phone or online

NHS 111 is free and is available 24 hours a day, 7 days a week. You answer questions about your symptoms on the website, or by speaking to a fully trained adviser on the phone. Depending on the situation you will:

• find out what local service can help you
• be connected to a nurse, emergency dentist, pharmacist or GP
• get a face-to-face appointment if you need one
• be given an arrival time if you need to go to A&E – this might mean you spend less time in A&E
• be told how to get any medicine you need
• get self-care advice

Contacting NHS 111 first makes it easier for you to get the right advice or treatment

Visit NHS 111

If you or someone you know is experiencing a life-threatening medical emergency, you should still attend A&E or call 999 immediately.

Check it’s not an emergency

Call 999 now if you have any of these:

Signs of a heart attack 
pain like a very tight band, heavy weight or squeezing in the centre of your chest

Signs of a stroke 
face dropping on one side, can’t hold both arms up, difficulty speaking

Tried to end your life 
by taking something or harming yourself

Severe difficulty breathing 
not being able to get words out, choking or gasping

Heavy bleeding 
spraying, pouring or enough to make a puddle

Severe injuries 
after a serious accident

Seizure (fit) 
someone is shaking or jerking because of a fit, or is unconscious (can’t be woken up)

Sudden, rapid swelling 
of the lips, mouth, throat or tongue

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